General rules when it comes to tipping

July 01 2016, Marie-Andrée Boisvert

General rules when it comes to tipping
Summer vacations are fast approaching for most of us, so we decided to help you a little by suggesting some general rules when it comes to tipping.

Summer vacations are fast approaching for most of us, so we decided to help you a little by suggesting some general rules when it comes to tipping.

Restaurants and bars

 

First, it’s customary to tip waiters and bartenders, because they’re paid below the minimum wage in most Canadian provinces.

  • Restaurant server: 15% before taxes, including the price of alcohol (amount calculated on the actual value of the bill if the service is paid with a coupon from Groupon or Tuango, for example)
  • Buffetserver: 10%
  • Attendant at a takeout counter in a restaurant: no tip
  • Attendant at a counter where one orders standing, with a tray: at your discretion
  • Server at a bar: from $1 to $2 per beverage
  • Cloakroom attendant: about $2 (no tip if the coat check is free)
  • Beer vendor in the stands: from $1 to $2 per beverage
  • Takeout orders: no tip required

 

Hotels, recreation and transportation 

 

  • Chamber maid: at least $2 per room per day (leave daily)
  • Porter: from $1 to $2 per bag
  • Server who brings meals to the room: no tip because the service charges are usually added to the bill
  • Cruise: depending on the cruise line standards (included in the cruise price, added to the account, paid in an envelope or not expected)
  • Rental of ho on a site as with Airbnb: no tip (or host/hostess gift at your discretion)
  • Taxi driver: 10%, if they offer minor services
  • Guide in an outdoor activity such as a riding guide: $ 5, but it may depend, for example, the quality of the service. No tip if the guide is self-employed.
  • Gas station attendant: no requirement, as customers pay extra to receive service

 

Body treatments

  • Massage therapist: 10% (no tip if it’s a medical treatment)
  • Service paid with a gift card: 10% of the actual value

 

Delivery person

  • Restaurant delivery person: 10% (even if there are delivery charges)
  • Paperboy: 10%

 

But one question remains: "When should we give a larger tip?" Reward service, availability or special effort by giving a little more for the service provided.

 

While propriety and etiquette determine the gratuity for service rendered, it remains at your discretion no matter what the circumstances.

 

Source: ProtectYourself